NINJA: The Two Numbers That Could Save Your Life

Photo by: Funky64

Being a ninja is inherently dangerous work.  Ironically, many of us stretch, exercise, and eat well, so that we may engage in inherently dangerous activities for fun.  Whether you are a rock, ice, or mountain climber, a surfer or snowboarder, rider of horses or motorcycles, marathon runner or tri-athlete…you are exposing yourself to the potential for a serious negative event.  Of course, driving to the grocery store can be a dangerous activity too.  Remembering these two numbers may make a difference in whether you survive or not.

The two numbers are 98.6 and 3 and they are brought to you courtesy of the United States Air Force.  The U.S. Air Force Survival School at Fairchild Air Force Base provides survival training to aircrew members and others and they drill these numbers into their students heads.

Photo by: purplemattfish

MAINTAIN 98.6 

Overheating or exposure to cold, both can disorient you and take you out of the game or worse, if you survive the initial catastrophe, they can kill you  Your number one priority in a survival situation is to…

MAINTAIN 98.6

Photo by: splorp

THE RULE OF 3

You cannot survive-

3 SECONDS WITHOUT SPIRIT AND HOPE

3 MINUTES WITHOUT AIR

3 HOURS WITHOUT SHELTER IN EXTREME CONDITIONS

3 DAYS WITHOUT WATER

3 WEEKS WITHOUT FOOD

3 MONTHS WITHOUT COMPANIONSHIP OR LOVE

Memorize these priorities in order and manage them in the same order.

If you want to see a vivid example of the importance of 98.6 and the Rule of 3 watch or re-watch Touching the Void.  To read more about survivors, what it takes to be one, and how to improve your odds of surviving a serious negative event read: The Survivors Club: The Secrets and Science that could Save Your Life by Ben Sherwood and check out The Survivors Club website.

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2 responses to “NINJA: The Two Numbers That Could Save Your Life

  1. that rule of 3 is awesome….

    • JC: Another area you may be interested in is non-event feedback loops.

      The thinking process behind non-event feedback is predicated on the following belief: Nothing bad happened last time and nothing bad happened to someone else; therefore, nothing bad will happen this time to me. The psychology of non-event feedback is complex, but its very existence leads to following reality:

      The crag that you climb the most, the slope that you ski the most, the mountain that you’ve been up the most times…these are the most dangerous places that you will ever go.

      http://fwd4.me/LTN

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